In early May of 2018, the Toronto Blue Jays star closer Roberto Osuna was arrested and charged with assaulting a woman, his girlfriend at the time. In late October of 2018, there is a good chance he may be pitching the final out of the 2018 World Series for the championship favorite Houston Astros, who acquired him at the end of July. The fact that this is a real possibility shows that there must be a change in values within Major League Baseball and Professional sport in general.

Osuna served a 75 game suspension in accordance to the MLB domestic violence policy and returned to the Astros bullpen in early August and has been pitching and closing out games since, and will be eligible to play in the play-offs for the Astros. In comparison, Seattle Mariners star infielder Robinson Cano was suspended 80 games earlier this season for performance enhancing drug (PED) use, and would be ineligible to play in the play-offs if his team were to make it this year. This comparison shines light on the values of MLB, as the use of PEDs to gain an unfair advantage in a game is punished more severely than domestic assault. (Professional Sports Leagues and Domestic Violence)

The values of the Houston Astros are also on display, as the front office and ownership made a statement that on field performance and winning is the only important factor, and out-weighed the impact that acquiring Osuna may have on victims of domestic abuse who are/were fans of the Astros, and of Major League Baseball in general.

Did Major League Baseball and the Houston Astros drop the ball with the possibility that Osuna could be at center stage of the biggest moment of the baseball season? Do sports teams have a responsibility to ensure that their players are stand up citizens, or should it always come down performance on the field and to doing whatever it takes to win?

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