It is a well-known fact that women get paid less than men do for the same job or task. Women have been fighting for equal pay for countless years, and there is still a way to go. The severity of the gap is almost overwhelming, for example, Stephen Curry of the Golden State Warriors has a $34.7 million/year contract (CBS News, 2018), while top-tier players in the WNBA can make a maximum of $110,000 (Lamonier, 2018). What causes this enormous gap in pay between male and female athletes? Female sports are commonly viewed as less entertaining than male sports. They have less game attendance and also less media presence than men, but why?

People often view women’s sport as boring in comparison to men’s, they enjoy the speed, competition, and physicality of male sports. In sports considered to be more feminine such as dancing, figure skating, or tennis females are watched more often because of the “feminine” component and that they make be considered “beautiful” and men are not supposed to be seen in likes of beauty.

Are female athlete’s fighting back and speaking out? Abby Wambach, a retired USA national soccer team player and World Cup champion, has used her voice to bring the pay gap into the  media. It is not only the athletes facing this major gap in pay but also coaching staff have a salary difference. Female coaches base salary is estimated 50% less than that of a male coaches base salary (Humphreys, 2000). It is time for women in sports, coaching staff, fans, and all women to make a stand to fight to close the wage gap and earn better compensation for their work.

Abby Wambach #20 of the United States celebrates the 5-2 victory against Japan in the FIFA Women's World Cup Canada 2015 Final at BC Place Stadium on July 5, 2015 in Vancouver, Canada.
Abby Wambach after a victory over Japan at the 2015 FIFA World Cup.
Image by: Grombkowski—Getty Images

 

Feature image: Ronald Martinez/Getty Images
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